The Channel logo

back to article Time to rid ourselves of the tech channel zombies

One thing is certain, we’re all going to die at some point while encountering high and low points along the way. Life is a journey, with no guaranteed time of departure. And business is no different. The loss of names such as Woolworth, Clinton, Jessop, Comet, HMV and now Blockbuster may be sad, but it’s also part of the journey …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

Gold badge
Unhappy

It's a good question how local authorities will react to this.

Retail has provided jobs (and taxes) everywhere. for a long time and it's likely local governments will try to do something about this.

So what happens when most kinds of shop are simply not needed?

Who will have won when the shops have gone?

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Currys....

I went to buy something in Currys a few days ago.......(nothing expensive), we were greeted at the door by an assistant who's sole purpose seemed to be to say Hello, we were asked by four different sales types if they could 'help us', I picked what I wanted from the shelf, we were directed to the till by another assistant who's sole purpose seemed to be to direct us to the very obvious till, at the till I had to stand in a queue, while the only person serving had a long discussion with some old bloke about his ancient mobile phone, after several minutes of this pointless conversation she left the till area to 'go find someone to assist him', at this point I chucked my prospective purchase in the nearest bargain bin and left the shop.... I was pleasantly wished goodbye by another pointless assistant....

The shop was massively over staffed, with covens of assistants al over the store, but no fucker wanted my money... no sale..... oh and for the record, this was their brand spanking new Solihull Currys/PC World combi super store.....

4
0
Silver badge

Getting away from your core competency

So I (used to) go to Barnes'n'Noble a lot to browse & buy books. It was a lot easier than browsing Amazon and much better for finding stuff I liked but didn't know I liked which is pretty much impossible to search for on the net.

They had a big selection of interesting books.

Now they have a tiny selection of mass-market popular books, and toys, puzzles, a coffee shop, DVDs, CDs, a large Nook sales display, several huge racks of magazines I can get in the grocery store, a half-store "multimedia" section that no one visits, and tons of other shit taking up space from selling interesting books.

For example, I'm 90 miles from Kennedy Space Center and 30 miles from Walt Disney World, yet they don't even have any space/astronomy/science books and very little Disney stuff any more. I know that used to sell, because when they had it, the employees I knew said it sold well. So why don't they have that any more?

This is why they're going out of business.

3
0
Unhappy

Re: Getting away from your core competency

Sounds a lot like WHSmith in the UK - rubbish at everything.

2
0
Gold badge
Unhappy

Re: Getting away from your core competency

"For example, I'm 90 miles from Kennedy Space Center and 30 miles from Walt Disney World, yet they don't even have any space/astronomy/science books and very little Disney stuff any more. I"

Trouble is that would require individual branches to develop, how to put it, "personality."

Which is entirely against the corporate "uniform retail experience" so beloved of large corporate chains.

Making the Timbuktu Barnes & Noble* (if it exists) exactly like your local one.

I mention Timbuktu as it had one of the world's oldest libraries (A UN world heritage site). It has been severely damaged by Islamist militants. No I doubt you'd be able to find any of the translations in store either.

0
0
Thumb Up

great article

"support the "living dead" either in High Streets or elsewhere is totally wrong"

You got that right. I didnt know people were campaining, although I have seen a lot of puzzled sad looking faces on the news.

2
0
Pint

Hard.. but necessary

It's hard to take sometimes, waves of nostalgia at the loss of HMV and Comet, who sold my wife and I our first dryer. But yes, it's necessary. I still think it's premature to speak of the demise of the PC or laptop in some form or another. There are far too many applications and games for which a keyboard and mouse are by far the best way to interact with and most importantly the issue of storage has yet to be resolved properly. The current system of surface mounting pitifully small SD cards at progressively outrageous prices has got to give and indeed thanks to hard disk manufacturers it soon will. At least one manufacturer has released a portable HD with a built in WiFi access point that can be accessed directly by iOS or Android, as well as via the internet if you choose to leave it at home and connect it to a router. Lasts about 10 hours unplugged btw, but still needs work as it's access point's bandwidth is limited to 250 mbits shared between all connected devices (up to 10).

Still what you're left with is a computer that looks worse than an expanded Amiga 500. By the time you've bought your keyboard, mouse and storage you might as well have bought a $800-$1000 PC with a far superior processor and video card.

Those that say that's not the point, these things are portable in a way that laptops can only dream of are correct. At least partly. However the biggest purchaser of PCs is the corporate world and I challenge you to find one office that will accept the shite productivity apps that are currently available and will put up with a balancing their monitor against a phone book because the boss was too cheap to spring for the $30 stand. The crappy $50 magnetic covers Apple sell stop working as stands after about two months of gentle use.. magnets aren't forever.

So yeah, I won't cry when Dell, Gateway and HP die (although I will feel for the rank and file), but I don't see that happening for about another decade.

0
0
Meh

If you bother to look around your local high street on a Saturday morning you'll see that shopping is as much a social activity as a commercial one. Replacing shared experiences with asocial ones tends not to end well (except for the large corporates).

4
0
Bronze badge

For more than 10 years, I have on shopping trips with my partner been the one who holds the bags and waits patiently while she disappears into the changing rooms with an armful of stuff only to come out saying she didn't like any of it. Along the way I've drunk numerous indifferent expensive cups of tea in high-street coffee shops.

And it's always been a lot more fun than making myself a cup of tea -however good - at home and passing her purse to her so can order something online.

2
0
Gold badge
Unhappy

So who could be the survivors?

Perishable goods IE fruit, veg and meat, with shorter supply chains, lower overheads and possibly better quality and prices.

Clothing, where accurate fit is important?

Brans "sheltering" inside branches of Tesco's and other supermarkets?

But does the UK really need that many coffee shop chains?

I think people do want some kind of communal retail experience and something new will start to form but I'm b**ered if I know what.

As for everyone else my instinct is more specialised shops backed with a well developed web presence. In essence a relatively small (a large branch or small chain of large branches) physical presence with a big virtual presence selling stuff you want to get hands-on with to tell the difference.

0
0
Bronze badge

Halogen?

That's so last-century - these days it's high power LEDs, often with a hub dynamo (yes they did die out in the 1970s, but they've been reinvented, and now they can power your USB devices too).

0
0

We have come quite a distance since my first computer; the Sinclair ZX81

0
0
Bronze badge
Holmes

But does the UK really need that many coffee shop chains?

Because theres more profit and less trouble customer-wise if you sell a cup of coffee as opposed to an alcoholic beverage

0
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.

Opinion

Love

Chris Mellor

Tandberg and Sphere3D deals offer hope after 18 bad ones
Fraud image
Openstack log

Features

No, silly... he was the fall guy for years of Finnish folly
Fraud image
Frodo and the Ring
Microsoft's strategy is to make Store apps popular. Good luck with that