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* Posts by A Non e-mouse

814 posts • joined 30 Jan 2010

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Google SUES Mississippi Attorney General 'for doing MPAA's dirty work'

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Only in America

Now if we could just get lobbyists, corporations and anyone else with a billion dollars lying around to stop writing Congressional bills.

From my vantage point on this side of the pond, I thought America was run by the rich for the rich? The poor are just there to make the rich richer.

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ICANN HACKED: Intruders poke around global DNS innards

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Survey?

-f) MPAA

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Sony hackers dump more hunks of stolen data, promise another 'Christmas gift'

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Sticking it to the Man is one thing

Sounds to me like they're still holding some "nuke": like private signing keys...

Already been done arstechnica.com/security/2014/12/hackers-promise-christmas-present-sony-pictures-wont-like/

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Sony to media: stop publishing our stolen stuff or we'll get nasty

A Non e-mouse
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Journalistic Truth

[Y]our correspondent worked for a publishing house the[sic] also printed celebrity rags and learned that there was not always a close relationship between the truth and their content.

I thought the journalist's motto was: "Don't let the truth get in the way of a good story"?

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Hold the front page: Spain's anti-Google lobbyists lobby for Google News return

A Non e-mouse
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Money

If Google makes no money from their Google News service, why do they run it? They're not a charity are they?

Unless, of course, Google don't make explicit money from adverts, but use the service to increase their knowledge of you.

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REVEALED: Titsup flight plan mainframe borks UK air traffic control

A Non e-mouse
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Mirrored systems

The problem with lock-step mirrored systems is how you avoid the entire system going down when both halves are fed the same bad data.

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A Non e-mouse
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So the flight data server stores where the aircraft intends to go (the flight plan), whilst the flight server has the radar data (where the aircraft is right now).

The author says that if the flight data server does offline for eight minutes safety features kick in as aircraft can travel a long way in that time.

But the flight data server only holds where the plane intends to go. The flight server continues to know, from the radar, where the plane is. So why this shutdown after eight minutes? I think we need a bit more information.

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Car-crash IT: HUGE write-off for Universal Credit - PAC

A Non e-mouse
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Re: So they've saved £2 billion by putting 18,000 people on the system?

Or those 18,000 people were being over-paid £111K per person in benefits.

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Hipsters snap up iPod Classics for $$$s after Apple kills rusty gadget

A Non e-mouse
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HD Availability

I thought the classic iPod was terminated due to Apple no longer being able to get the HDs for them?

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Put me through to Buffy's room, please. Sony hackers leak stars' numbers, travel aliases

A Non e-mouse
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Joke

@ A/C Re: What got hacked exactly.

ODDS just-in from Paddy-Power

Shouldn't that be: "Odds just-in from Paddy-Pwnd?"

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IBM Research wants laptop batteries to retire and slum it

A Non e-mouse
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Nice idea for reuse, but won't there be problems with different batteries having different connectors, voltages, etc?

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VMware warns of vCenter cross-site-scripting bug

A Non e-mouse
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VMWare and Certificates

"VMWare" and "Certificates" Two words to strike fear into even the hardened sysadmin.

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EE's not-spot-busting small cell trial delights Cumbrian villagers

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Signal strength?

Many people in rural areas live in lovely old houses, with thick stone walls (mine are 18 ins thick!), and small windows

People in the older towns/cities in the UK (Places considered urban by some) have exactly the same problem....

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Brit smut slingers shafted by UK censors' stiff new stance

A Non e-mouse
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WTF?

WTF

I can understand strangulation/breathplay being on the banned list as people have died from that stuff. But since when has fisting been life threatening? How many people (male or female) have been rushed to hospital (or even died) after being fisted during sex?

And why ban female ejaculation but not male? Is female ejaculation not considered normal or natural?!?

As to the rest of the list: WTF?!? If the participants are all consenting adults, what's the problem? Just because it's not your cup of tea doesn't mean no-one else will like it.

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Vendors coalesce around 'MGBase-T' 2.5/5 Gbps Ethernet

A Non e-mouse
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Background

Maybe a bit of background, El Reg, as to how they're going to achieve this?

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SUPER-SUEBALL heading IBM's way in Australia

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Completion?

Public sector are incapable of getting a project through the Analysis phase..

To be fair to public sector employees (I was one once) the problem isn't so much public sector as politicians. As soon as a politician starts getting their claws on a project, any hope of a sane outcome evaporates. Remember, politicians are only interested in sound-bites about the here and now: They don't worry their little heads about minor implementation details. So it's up to the people at the coal face to try and best turn the politicians wild (& vague) fantasy into reality. The problem is, is that for really big projects, politicians (and policies) will change over the lifetime of the project, so the poor project manager is stuck trying to nail jelly to a wall.

Some of this can, of course, be controlled by the simple mantra of "Keep it simple, stupid". But small successful projects aren't very impressive on the campaign trail so the politician would rather something a bit more meaty to crow about.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Are you listening UK Gov?

Whilst IBM are no saints in this debacle, it was precipitated by inept project management by the state. If IBM have been banned from having IT contracts in the state, have the people in the government been banned from project work too?

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systemd row ends with Debian getting forked

A Non e-mouse
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Re: What is systemd

Others have done a good explanation of what a Unix Init system does. I believe they miss a couple of valuable points.

Firstly, systemd came about to try to improve boot speed. Because a typical Unix init system is made up of a series of shell scripts, you have to start a shell, parse the script, then run it for each init task. Shells can be relatively expensive to start, so systemd avoids this by not using a shell, and just having a single binary that reads configuration files.

An objection to systemd, though, is that systemd is more than just an init system and actually does lots of other things that are typically done by separate little programs. (So breaking the Unix tenant of "Do one thing and do it well") By taking on more and more little tasks, it becomes more and more tied to Linux - you can't port systemd easily to the BSDs for example. As other things start to depend on systemd, then they too become impossible to port to other versions of Unix. (There is actually a project trying to create/port a minimalist version of systemd which is more cross-unix friendly.)

Even on lwn.net (which is usually quite tame compared to other forums) the discussion about the whole Systemd/Debian debate is getting quite heated. The article about the Devuan fork has already attracted over 200 posts in two days - quite a high comment rate for an lwn article.

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NHS and POLICE non-emergency services GO DARK after Voda switch failure - source

A Non e-mouse
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Yes I know, I'm paranoid...

No, you're not paranoid. You're a sysadmin who's learned over the years not to trust the vendors, and also knows that resiliency, despite all the claims to the contrary, is fragile (usually due to it introducing extra complexity).

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Wireless Power standards are like Highlanders: There can be only ONE

A Non e-mouse
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Coat

Betamax Vs VHS

Didn't VHS win over Betamax because Sony refused to allow pr0n films to be released on Betamax? So the obvious answer to the wireless charging wars is for one of the alliances to release "adult" toys supporting their wireless charging system.

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Google turns on shiny new .google top-level domain – but WHY?

A Non e-mouse
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Money for ICANN

No one - not even the brands themselves - know yet what to do with their slice of the internet

Only ICANN is interested in these domains as another source of money. The big companies (BBC, et al) have all bought these domains just to protect their brand name - not because they wanted them.

[T]he fees [Google] needs to pay ICANN - a flat fee of several thousand dollars a year and 20 cents per domain..

Why? Does it really cost several thousand dollars a year to maintain a few lines in the root nameserver configuration files? Surely with the hundreds of thousands of dollars ICANN charged to apply for these domains, ICANN could let the winners have them for no ongoing fee?

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And the award for the world's most tech-savvy country goes to …

A Non e-mouse
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Teaching using IT

I'm not sure the percentage of teachers teaching using IT is a useful metric. What's it trying to show?

IT does NOT make a bad teacher a good teacher. A good teacher will still be a good teacher with or without IT in the classroom. (And a vice versa with a bad teacher)

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Let's vote on breaking up Google, say MEPs with NO power to do any such thing

A Non e-mouse
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Why don't they look at splitting up companies that are under their jurisdiction e.g. Banks. Separate the risky investment side of the house from the day-to-day banking side.

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Get a job in Germany – where most activities are precursors to drinking

A Non e-mouse
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Don't hang around with other expats too much and also try to learn the language

Isn't that the key to settling into any foreign country?

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Windows Phone will snatch biz No 2 spot from Android – analyst

A Non e-mouse
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BYOD?

I thought the world was moving towards BYOD and the days of central IT dictating what phones/tablets (or even laptops) people used was in the dim and distant past?

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Giant bank IT cockup of 2012 'could have brought down ENTIRE financial system'

A Non e-mouse
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The PRA & FCA have both fined the banks for the same cock-up.

As much as I want to hate the merchant bankers, but isn't this a case of Double Jeopardy?

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NOKIA - Not FINNished yet! BEHOLD the somewhat DULL MYSTERY DEVICE!

A Non e-mouse
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Interesting

It's interesting Nokia coming back into the devices market so quickly (Especially at the low end where margins are wafer thin). Did the Nokia big-wigs realise that their handset division was out of control and flogging it off and starting again with a clean slate was their plan all along?

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Ofcom tackles complaint over Premier League footie TV rights

A Non e-mouse
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Flame

It always amazes me that people pay so much money to see a bunch of over-paid prima donnas running around a field chasing a ball for 90 minutes.

But then I remember: Football is not about sport, it's about entertainment. The kind of entertainment that is perpetuated by programs like X-Factor.

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Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age

A Non e-mouse
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Infinite Loop?

To add to the randomness...the radio receiver frequency also bounces around randomly

So what's the source for the randomness for the random frequency hopping? Another OpenRNG?

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DEATH fails to end mobile contract: Widow forced to take HUBBY's ASHES into shop

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Are you really surprised?

In my day job, I have to deal a lot with telecomms companies. The all have one thing in common: They all suck at billing.

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Shuddit, Obama! Here in Blighty, we ISPs have net neutrality nailed

A Non e-mouse
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BT

One problem people often make is thinking BT is one company. BT are actually multiple companies with the BT brand: BT Openreach, BT Operate, BT Wholesale, BT Global Services, BT Retail, etc.

When you buy your broadband, it'll (probably) be from BT Retail, who may apply filtering so they don't have to buy as much bandwidth from BT Wholesale.

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A Non e-mouse
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Transparency

IMHO, the real issue isn't ISPs filtering or prioritising traffic, it's the ISP's not being open about what they're doing. If ISP "A" said that they limit P2P traffic, or throttle Youtube/Netflix in favor of their own services, you, as the consumer, could make an informed choice as to whether their package is right for you.

As are others here, I'm with Andrews & Arnold. On their website they clearly state:

"We provide a real internet connection ... such that IP packets from you get to where they should do, and IP packets to you get to you. There is no messing about."

BTW - I do love A&A's no-nonsense attitude :-)

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This 125mph train is fitted with LASERS. Sadly no sharks, though

A Non e-mouse
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Re: MENTOR does test the overhead LIVE!

I remain convinced that BR really were getting very good at running trains, when they were allowed to.

I think the problem with BR was that they weren't allowed to run trains as they weren't given the money.

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A Non e-mouse
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Thumb Up

Nerd's heaven. Now where can I buy a ticket?

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Amazon bags control of .book and .pay domains – but NOT .cloud

A Non e-mouse
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Dot dot

Most of this is a waste of time and money. The only one that vaguely sounds interesting is the .dot domain. I'm sure the dot.dot sub-domain will go for a lot a money! It reminds me of this guy with his email address dotat.at/email.html

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Don't assume public trusts you, MI5. 'Make a case' for surveillance – Former security chief

A Non e-mouse
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Trust

Bingo! Give the woman a job.

It is all about trust, and always has been.

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TORpedo'd dev dumps Doxbin files after police raids

A Non e-mouse
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I don't think it's as easy at that.

Firstly, the content via the TOR network is all encrypted. Then your traffic doesn't just go through one TOR server, but multiple before breaking out to the real world. Finally, a TOR node will be servicing multiple clients at the same time.

So, although you can see your packet enter the first TOR node, you can't tell which subsequent outbound packets from that TOR node are yours, and which belong to another client.

As has been mentioned in multiple places, it is possible to decloak TOR by controlling some TOR nodes and using statistical techniques. This is how it is suggested that this recent spate of TOR take downs were achieve.

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Forget 5G, UK.gov is making 2G fit for the 21st century!

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Underlying assumption

Problem with that is I doubt they hit the 95% coverage. It must fall well wide of that mark although I’m sure the big 4 believe otherwise either through ignorance of deceit.

I suspect the operators have drunk their own Kool Aid and believe their own marketing gumpf. If you believe their marketing coverage maps, then they probably are hitting 95%. But if you come into the real world, I can't believe it's even near 90%

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A Non e-mouse
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@ Ragarath - Re: Complete garbage about law enforcement challenges!

I seem to be able to roam easily while abroad. Why is it so much harder at home?

There are MVNOs in the UK that can offer you a cross-network SIM for use in the UK. The only downside is that they cost a fortune (compared a single network SIM, anyway)

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A Non e-mouse
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Rethink Research noted the irony of a government launching into a major shakeup of 2G just as the rest of the world is discussing 5G

No, because some (many?) of us struggle to get any mobile signal and would be very happy just to get a 2G GSM signal.

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Canonical pushes LXD, its new mysterious drug for Linux containers

A Non e-mouse
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Paravirtualisation?

This sounds a lot like paravirtualisaton to me.

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UN takeover of internet postponed indefinitely

A Non e-mouse
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Re: We do not need to trust these people and we should not trust them.

A company like Google has the resources to scan the entirety of the IPv4 address space

I think you'll find that you don't need Google's resources to scan the IPv4 address space. There have been many research papers where the researchers have scanned the Internet for some reason. My IP addresses at work are also getting continuously scanned and probed by various parties - and my work isn't a particularly high value target. (e.g. Finance, Central Government)

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New GCHQ spymaster: US tech giants are 'command and control networks for TERROR'

A Non e-mouse
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Lost our trust

If the spooks were performing targeted snooping against ner-do-wells, then I think many people would be OK with that. The problem is, the spooks got greedy and now snoop on everyone regardless of whether they're planning something nasty. Because of their greed, they've lost our (Well, at least, my) trust. But not only do they perform this questionable blanket surveillance, they then lie that they're doing it. They just don't know when to stop digging, do they?

The spooks need to wean themselves off blanket, global, mass surveillance, and be a bit more honest about what they're doing.

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BBC clamps down on ILLICIT iPlayer watchers

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Smart TVs too

Apparently it may be possible to fix some TVs by upgrading the firmware ... which is fine if you understand the concept of "upgrading the firmware" and have the means (PC, memory stick) to do so, but lots of users will be completely baffled.

I consider myself a geek and recently tried to upgrade the firmware on my TV. I followed the manufacturer's instructions closely and it failed every time.

Once I ignored the manufacturer's instructions and engaged my geek brain, I got the firmware to update.

Unless it's a simple "Press GO" over-the-air (or over-the-net for connected TVs) it's going to be too difficult (or too easy to get wrong) for many people. And as my experience shows, even the manufacturer can get it wrong.

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NHS slow to react as Windows XP support nears the end

A Non e-mouse
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Re: FOI FFS

I would argue that asking if a public sector body has its plans in order to migrate away from a soon to be end of life operating system is a valid use of FoI.

Disclaimer: I work in the public sector, and I get my fair share of sales droids abusing FoI to try and create sales leads.

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Microsoft brings the CLOUD that GOES ON FOREVER

A Non e-mouse
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Uploads

I suspect one of the limiting factors for unlimited space usage is upload bandwidth.

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Cisco patches three-year-old remote code-execution hole

A Non e-mouse
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Encrypted Telnet?

The vulnerability is due to insufficient boundary checks when processing telnet encryption keys

Since when does telnet have encryption keys?!?

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It's Big, it's Blue... it's simply FABLESS! IBM's chip-free future

A Non e-mouse
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@FutureShock999

This effectively spells the end of the POWER architecture too. Knowing that the support contract to produce new chips is only for 10 years

This doesn't mean that IBM will stop producing POWER systems in 10 years time. All it means is that in 10 years time IBM can go to other suppliers to make their silicon. (Or sign up again with GF.)

The 10 year sign-up was probably a requirement from GF to ensure some revenue for the fabs to make it worth while buying them.

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PARC Alto source code released by computer history museum

A Non e-mouse
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Portrait Screens

To the modern eye, the Alto looks odd – mostly because of the portrait orientation of its screen

At my place of work, a lot of people have portrait screens.

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You can crunch it all you like, but the answer is NOT always in the data

A Non e-mouse
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Know thy data

If you have a large enough dataset, you can make it say anything if you look hard enough. Just look at all the hidden messages in the bible.

This problem with thinking a larger data set will give you a better answer is not a new problem. (It was very recently discussed in the latest episode of the BBC More Or Less podcast) Their famous example was the 1936 Presidential election where a magazine undertook a poll to forecast the election result - and got it wrong. Yet a much smaller Gallup poll got the answer right.

(For those of us who have a passing interest in the use & abuse of numbers & statistics, the More Or Less podcast is an excellent weekly listen.)

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