The Channel logo

* Posts by John Brown (no body)

4617 posts • joined 21 May 2010

E-cigarettes help save lives, says Royal College of Physicians

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: A report based on evidence instead of prejudice ?

"I also choose to believe that it's a bad thing that young people are taking up this habit because they too believe it's safe."

All the evidence seems to point to the vast majority of vapers being people shifting from tobaco. Very very few people are *starting* vaping from being a non-smoker. There are many more young people starting on tobaco than are stating vaping.

I'm pretty sure El Reg covered this with links in the past.

0
0

Pro-ISIS hacking groups are still hooking up

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: It takes a special sort of person...

"I've met more than nutcase working in engineering and/or IT. "

Exactly. I once worked for a guy who, despite being very good at his job, claimed to have a working perpetual motion machine under development in his garage and it was only a matter of time before he ironed out the last few problems. Errmmm.....

0
0

UK's 'superfast' broadband is still complete dog toffee, even in London

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Why get Fibre?

Well, if you really want to be pedantic, it's FTTC then co-ax for maybe up to a few hundred metres. And co-ax is generally better than twisted pair.

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: re. virgin

"most folk are into streaming netflix and such, so I can easily see 100Mb/s as their "expected" speed."

And don't forget, on even the cheapest TV package, you can add Netflix and stream it direct via the STB and not even impact your BB anyway.

0
0

Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Oh, yeah... @1Rafayal

"I dont understand why organisations who are using Windows wouldn't want to use the enterprise version,"

As asked elsewhere, when does switching to enterprise/volume licensing become economic? How about my local newsagent who runs a couple of PCs in the back room? Can't you understand why they don't have an IT department, a sysadmin and an MS enterprise/volume licensing server to monitor it?

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Oh, yeah... @1Rafayal

"The fact of the matter is, like it or not, for everyone who is complaining about the GWX nag affecting business, it comes down to how your organisation is handling its licensing."

Bearing in mind it's almost impossible to buy a PC without a Windows Licence already attached, when does it become economic to add in the costs and complexity of enterprise licensing? Does an enterprise/volume licence take into account the already purchased licences?

Those are real questions by the way. I'm not involved with that side of the business.

5
0

SpaceX: We'll land on Mars in 2018 (cough, with NASA's help)

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Why send it empty?

"so the addition of what little you could fit in this Dragon module won't be super helpful."

Fill it with as many rolls of gaffer tape as will fit!! And a few packs of chewing gum and maybe a ball of string for good measure.

1
0

Samsung's little black box will hot-wire your car to the internet. Eek!

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: it might enable you to get smaller insurance quotes

Although I upvoted, it's pretty rare IME to see a posted sped limit increased. Speed limits, if being changed, are almost invariabley reduced, not increased.

On the other hand, over three different SatNavs, two different brands, a road near me was 60mph limit, reduced 3 years ago to 40mph, but all my SatNavs see it not only as a 30mph limit but mark the entire stretch as a "30mph mobile speed camera zone"

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: They day will never come that they are mandated

"Above a certain average mileage there is an inverse correlation between risk and mileage,"

Agreed. At least anecdotally, most of my near misses have occurred when I'm just leaving my home town or arriving back and I can be reasonably certain that the idiots doing the "wrong" thing are the ones doing the local commute and probably rarely drive more than 20 miles per day in town traffic only.

Of course there's always the odd idiot doing 70/80mph in driving rain and road spray on the motorway with a lane "closed for safety" and a 50mph limit in force. Usually in a big expensive car, so obviously too important to worry about minor restrictions when time is money :-(

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Not until someone makes me, and maybe not even then

"The idea, then, that I'd willingly choose to pay a *third party* to curate this data is mind-boggling ludicrous to me."

Ever since these insurance "black boxes" were first mooted I've wondered if the policy includes cover for the eventual and inevitable data breaches.

If you ask, they tell you it's all "secure" and proper measures are taken. But we already know that the entire industry is based on risk assessment. How much risk are they taking with our data? If they are confident of their risk assessment then an addendum to the policy to cover against a data breach or even a hack which could cause physical damage ought to be a free add-on, not an extra insurance charge.

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

"an unpopular imposition would be remembered at the ballot box."

I think you may be overestimating the attention span and memory capacity of the average voter.

0
0

The case for ethical ad-blocking

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Dear Advertisers, pucker up & KMA.

"I'm not advocating it (online ads), I hate it, but you do realise that you are getting all of this site content for free. You blocking an ad costs the site money, they can only sell an ad when it is served. You're looking down the wrong end of the telescope."

It depends on the site. It's not a one size fits all dilemma. Many site themselves are an "advert" for the company.

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Just block JavaScript

"Use NoScript (firefox), ScriptNo (chrome), etc."

Yep, that's what I do too. No ad-blockers here, just NoScript and Ghostery. On the whole, whitelisting the actual domain I'm visiting is all that is required for the site to work. Sometimes the site is using a Content Delivery Network for some aspects of their site. If I feel I'm missing something I'd like to see then I can either temporarily or permanently whitelist the CDN domain too. That pretty much takes care of everything. Oh yes, FlashBlock, so that stuff is click to play.

1
0

Microsoft fingered for Western Euro PC tragedy

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Microsoft

"There's no innovation, no listening to customers, just constant screw ups"

I think the problem isn't that they aren't listening, it's that they are listening to the wrong ones. Most of the big established tech/software companies are listening to the local hipsters and mapping those comments and use cases onto the rest of the world.

1
0

Redback sinks fangs into Oz builder's todger

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Angel

So, just a normal sexual encounter then?

"He said: "You’d experience pain — pain as the venom stimulates the nerves around the bite — along with swelling and increased blood pressure."

Have I been doing to wrong or something?

1
0

Game of P0wns: Malvertising menace strikes Pirate Bay season six downloads

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Where's our ad industry rep when you need him?

Lets see the staunch defence of the ad industry in the face of reports of "malvertising", especially bearing in mind that this not an isolated incident and not limited to the "darker" side of the net.

0
0

CERN publishes massive data set

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Free analysis

Send it as an email attachment?

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Free analysis

...maybe if we all torrent it? That should set a few alarm bells ringing around the Five Eyes and [m|r]iaa types :-)

Out of 300TB of data, there ought to be more than a few coincidental film and music fingerprints.

We all "know" that torrents are only ever used for illegal stuff </sarc>

1
0

Germans stick traffic lights in pavements for addicts who can't take their eyes off phones

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: ....near the local university

My job often takes me onto university campuses. Never have I met a such a bunch of rude, impolite and self-important bunch of twats. They habitually walk in wide groups and DO NOT have even the slightest notion of politeness when it comes to passing other people, especially when I'm carrying stuff.. These days I just barge through them. The flight-case can hurt. I don't care any more. If you can't beat them, join them

2
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Alert

Re: Never mind the article - this might be a good idea

"It always struck me that the pedestrian lights were hard for the visually impaired to spot and decipher. Yes, I know there are audio signals, but at a busy junction they're difficult to hear."

Yes, that can be an issue for some types of disability. What you should be outraged at is not just the lack of thought and care put into making life better for the disabled, but the waste of money spent "protecting" those who intentionally and wilfully temporarily "disable" themselves by being inconsiderate self absorbed utter twats.

1
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Onward march!

Yeah, I amongst others have referred to that story a few times in these comments sections. It should be required reading in all schools and the teacher forced at gunpoint if necessary to explain it to their students in minute detail. With an exam afterwards to make sure the lesson has gone in.

Then we issue free bumper packs of condoms to all the students.

0
0

Colander-wearing Irishman denied driver's licence in Pastafarian slapdown

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Considering that forgiveness is one of the prime tenets of Christianity, my personal experience of having rows with other people, the Catholics are the one most likely to hold onto a grudge and never "make up".

1
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Flame

Re: Ex Pastafarian

I think the correct term could be "apestotate"

No! It's definitely "apastatate" Burn the splitters!

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Well

"I applaud this guy for taking it as far as he did. It is a public service for reason that he endured the hardship of not driving for so long to make his, well, point."

It does, in reality, raise a very good point by forcing these government bodies to actually *think* about what a religion is and which ones may or may not have special dispensations. Scientology comes to mind as being recognised in some jurisdictions as a religion and as merely as a cult of nutters in most others, The arguments raised against Pastefarianism (all hail his noodly appendages!) can apply equally against most religions but most especially against new modern cults like scientology.

Bootnote

My spellchecker wants to "correct" Pastefarianism with Egalitarianism, which I find both amusing and appropriate.

3
0

El Reg Summer Lectures: Space, robots and digital homes

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

The internet of things

I hope the prof has read the El Reg comments sections and will be suitably prepared!

IoT doesn't get the best of receptions here :-)

I did get my hopes for a short moment as a I read "Yorkshire Grey" only have them dashed be the next few words "on Theobalds Road, London". Bugger. I though it might only be a 90 minute drive down to York or Leeds, they being about 90 miles away. But noooo, it's in London, where that 90 minutes is probably what it takes to do the last 9 miles :-(

3
0

Tokyo rebrands 2020 Olympics

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Mind worm

""Goooooood Mooorning Tokyo...."

wasn't that Adrian Cronauer?

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Maybe it's just me...

I have to admit to not especially thinking about things like that on any sort of regular or in-depth basis. Having said that, I thought exactly the same thing too. The "disabled" logo looks "incomplete". Not exactly PC symbology of the 21st century.

0
0

Thunderbird is GO: Mozilla prepares to jettison mail client

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

"LibreOffice could try to add it to its office suite in an attempt to counteract Outlook "

Yes, I think in the long run, giving it to The Open Document Foundation might well be the better option so they can help it interoperate more fully with Libre Office but, hopefully not actually integrating it.

Full interoperability with LO and a good calendaring system would make it a good alternative for many business users.

4
0

Net scum lock ancient Androids, force users to buy iTunes gift cards

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: This:

"What if the hardware can't support it?"

I'd bet most 5 year old smartphones would happily run a vanilla android. Might not run the manufacturers version with all the enforced add-ons bolted on that you often can't even stop from running never mind uninstall.

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Tight

"My TV is a 70 year old projector with a grandfather clock hooked up to it.."

Tight arse! Proper TVs were available 70 years ago.

0
0

F-35's dodgy software in the spotlight again

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Anyone seen the rabbit hole?

"What they seem to (nearly) have is systemd for the air."

Hammer, meet mail head.

Certainly one of the better analogies I've seen recently :-)

1
0

Ad-blocker blocking websites face legal peril at hands of privacy bods

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Discussion over. Nothing to see here. Move along.

"http://blockadblock.com/adblocking/claim-detecting-adblock-may-illegal/"

Interestingly, that site tried to drop a cookie on my browser without persmission in direct contravention of The 2009 ePrivacy Directive which, ironicly, it uses to try to discredit Hanff.

The 2009 ePrivacy Directive

In 2009 the EC passed the "ePrivacy Directive" as part of their Regulatory

Framework for Electronic Communications. Among other things, the ePrivacy

Directive requires any website using cookies to get user permission before

setting or retrieving any persistent data.

FWIW my browser of choice to visit the above referenced site was Lynx.

1
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: snooping my machine

"Now, if people would only pick sites based on how bad or good ads on them are"

FFS, you really are on another planet! NO ONE EVER picks a site based on the quality of the ads. People pick a site based on the content. If the ads are obnoxious they leave and try elsewhere.

It's the CONTENT they want. They are not looking for ads. The ads are an intrusion and if a site becomes popular, it's greedy bastards like you who ruin it by thinking you can get more click throughs and more money by "competing" for the most intrusive and obnoxious ads. The actions of the users are blindingly obvious. WE DON'T LIKE YOUR ADS. We "vote" with our eyeballs and go somewhere else. You evil bastards follow us and ruin the the alternative site too, so we move again and STILL you follow us. Ad blockers are a response to YOUR escalation.

If a site is unusable with 3rd party scripts blocked then I go somewhere else. If you want my eyeballs then find a way to place ads which are silent, static and don't need 3rd party scripts slinging malware at me. The landscape is changing and you have to adapt. Treating your potential customers as the enemy and accusing them of theft isn't going to win you any friends.

5
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: @FF22

"Wrong. They will pay the same amount or even more. Why? Because advertisers will just shift ad formats and channels that are not blockable. Like billboard advertising. Or television advertising. Or sponsored content. Or native advertising."

So, you are saying I'm right but for subtly different reasons. The ad companies have to spend more on R&D and more on ad placement marketing to find out how to get the same number of ads placed. That either cuts into there profits or they put their prices up and the people buying the ads may go elsewhere.

4
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: @FF22

"And the advertisers? They will be still laughing their asses off. They won't be affected by this at all. "

I don't think you understand how your own industry works. Yes, the advertiser doesn't pay for the ads not seen due to ad-blockers. But that also means they sold fewer ads. Which in turn means the people paying for the ad campaign will pay less. Or be less happy so go somewhere else.

5
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: snooping my machine

"The system will just notice automatically what's good, and what's bad, and adapt to that and to your preferences."

What "system"? How does it know where I've gone? How does it know that the site I visit isn't just a one off? How does know that the reason I didn't go back was because of the ads? Maybe I didn't go back because of the content, ie the primary reason I went there in the first place.

I think that whooshing sound you are hearing is the points of others going over your head, not ours. NO ONE visits a site specifically to see 3rd party adverts.

At best, what your "system" will do is notice that one site is more popular than another and start pushing the obnoxious ads there instead of the less popular one which people stopped visiting because of your obnoxious ads in the first place. The way you describe your "system" adapting is more akin to an infectious disease spreading from host to host when it should be mutating into something beneficial.

16
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: snooping my machine

Ad blocking is not the solution, but the very problem that makes ads larger and more obtrusive."

You're missing the point. People are blocking ads in growing numbers BECAUSE they are more and more intrusive and obnoxious. Worse, the ad industry has utterly failed at policing itself by vetting ads for malware and allowing themselves to be hijacked to such an extent that even IT illiterate users are installing ad blockers.

As I said in another post, I don't use an ad blocker. I do, however, use NoScript. If the advertisers want me to see ads then they can deliver them in a way that is unlikely to allow malware through to my system, just like they used to.

11
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: 'Wired' does this.

"a message to check various things "and switch off any Ad Blockers" comes up. Not on every video, but enough to make it annoying."

Yep, it's utterly crazy and made worse by lazy webdevs. I don't use an ad blocker. But I do use NoScript. I will almost always whitelist the URI of the site I am visiting if it's a useful site and I'm likely to re-visit and sometimes even the CDN they use. But I leave the 3rd party scripts blocked. It's not my fault if they want to use scripts to show me ads. If the ads came from 3rd party URIs without using scripts then I have no doubt they would appear on my screen as intended. I'd be fine with that. But so many ad slingers have proven unable to police themselves by flinging out malware that I simply do not trust them to be allowed to execute code on my PC.

5
0

Remain in the EU and help me snoop on the world, says Theresa May

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Coat

Prüm agreement

Is it just me that read that as Pr0n agreement?

The dirty mac -------------------->

1
0

El Reg Quid-A-Day Nosh Posse spared chickpea ordeal

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Sorry to hear the project is on hold

"Live Below the Line decided to take a break and regroup for 2017. So, the decision was made for us."

Cutbacks or austerity; we're all in it together. Unless you have a Panama hat.

0
0

Google Loon balloon crash lands in Chile

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Joke

Re: Disaster relief indeed

It was Los Angeles in Chile, so no worries there. it's just some 3rd world banana republic and Google can pay them off with a few trinkets.

0
0
John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Irresponsible

"Hopefully they will release some in the Southern US!."

Yes, one of the major downsides of capitalism as practised in the Land of the Free where socialism is a swear word on a par with communism. No doubt if the local or state authorities tried to install a usable network, the commercial incumbents would sue them rather than actually compete.

1
0

If Android’s wings are clipped, other Google platforms may gain

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Least likely

"I wonder why El Reg doesn't report on how Google uses the data they capture from their 'free' analytics and what happens if you suddenly remove them from your site."

And it's not as if google analytics isn't the only option either. Just look at the blocked scripts and blocked tracking cookies when you visit a news site, especially those of newspapers.

3
0

Anonymous whales on Denmark, Iceland with OpKillingBay DDoS

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

"but we weren't eating the badgers"

But they do make awfully good shaving brushes.

0
0

Dutch students serve up world's first 'drone café'

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Is the control code...

If it ever gets a commercial release you can just bet all the processing power will be in the cloud until the company goes belly up along with your expensive drone butler.

0
0

Ten years in the clink, file-sharing monsters! (If UK govt gets its way)

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: Actually, no

"Unless you're actually running a pirate site, I wouldn't worry."

...and Iceland isn't a terrorist nation. RIPA isn't used to check where the parents of school children live. I don't have to show my DBS every time I visit a school.

I'd have thought a tech journalist might have heard of feature creep.

12
0

Amazon attempts rule fudge to take exclusive control of new dot-words

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

"The point you're missing is that ICANN has (sensibly) decreed that generic TLDs can't be reserved for the exclusive use of the owner."

You're right, I did miss that vital point.

It should be interesting see which words are classed as generic, who decides, and who appeals the decisions though. I might have to buy shares in popcorn makers.

2
0

Will Comcast's set-box killer murder your data caps? The truth revealed

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge
Coat

why is it not an internet service?

"When they say it is an IP-enabled service and it is traveling over their network, why is it not an internet service?" he told The Reg.

Oh that's easy, me sir! me sir! <raises hand>

An "internet" is a network of networks and if the data originates on and stays on their own internal network then it's not an "internet service".

6
1

Guess what's 'easily hacked'? Yes, that's right: Smart city transport infrastructure

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Re: That's soooo easy to fix..

"Just drop the word "Smart" from such efforts,"

Especially since to most of the population outside of the US, smart doesn't mean what they think it means.

1
0

Romania suffers Eurovision premature ejection

John Brown (no body)
Silver badge

Here in the UK....

...we do tend to treat Eurovision as a bit of a joke, but it's worth remembering that much of europe treats it quite seriously, especially the ex-USSR and satellite states where they have a long history of all sorts of local, regional and national talent competitions of all types.

I'm not sure if the rest of Eurovision sees the same politically motivated voting that we do or if they are just conveniently blind to it.

4
1

Forums

Opinion

Walking on water, image via Shutterstock

Chris Mellor

IDC stats reveal who's who in the backup appliance bearpit
Carry on Cleo

Gavin Clarke

Infamy, infamy, Amazon and Microsoft have all got it in for me!

Tim Anderson

Also signals stronger cross-platform tools, access to new markets

Features

Shouting match
Single market vs. rest of the world
hacker
Mostly it's financial crime. Here's what all the cool kids' terms mean in English
Apple logo. Pic: Blake Patterson
Plenty of bumps in the 40-year road for Mac makers
single pain of glass