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* Posts by John Brown (no body)

3276 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Apple: Hey TV people, wanna be in the same place Samsung phones are these days?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: I want...

"perpetuate the warez industry"

Yes, exactly what I came here to say. If content delivery is going to be even more broken up and separated across different platforms then it's only going to piss off the consumers who are more likely to get their content from "other sources".

Just the other day in the pub I overheard one of the barmen telling the other how to install Kodi onto a TV stick (not sure which one he mentioned) but I did hear him saying there were add-ons to watch all the sports and films for free. Neither sounded especially IT literate nor seemed to have any concept that it may not be entirely legal. It was just something you buy then update and then watch "free" telly on.

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Google's Chrome to gag noisy tabs until you click on them

John Brown (no body)
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"This cool feature..."

NO. It's NOT cool. It's essential. It's what many users have been crying out for for years. It's why I don't use Chrome and DO use flashblock

A "cool" feature is something we didn't realise we wanted until we see it and realise how useful it will be. This is something which was wanted for ages.

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Slip-streaming Tesla, Oz battery-maker plots home-biz launch

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "...$15,000 easily recoverable over ten years..."

"Which state are you in? In SA 25 - 36c/kWh is more the norm"

It's also worth noting what the price of leccy was 10 years ago compared to now and what it might cost in 10 years time. Assuming the the fuel wars haven't started and Mad Max only cares where his next tank of petrol is coming from, having no need for an electric razor any more.

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So, was it really the Commies that caused the early 20th Century inequality collapse?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The growth

"Eg post war air travel in ex-military DC3s (technically C47s). Aircraft designs built on work began during the war. Britain's temporary lead in jets."

That's an almost perfect example of civilian industry built out of war. I'd go further and suggest the entire civil aviation industry was built on the back of bomber development in the 14-18 war.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: The growth

"Plus you had capital controls to stop vast sums of money being sent out of your economy unless the government approved it."

I'd add in Tims point of "pent up" technological change still in the "lag" period from the 30's which should have made it into the economy during the 40's but was either held back due to lack of a commercial economy/materials or being used purely for the war effort.

I'd also add in the technological leaps that were hot-housed because of the war and the enforced efficiencies and improvements made to the entire productivity of the UK brought on by the war. Prior to that period we were still very much living on past achievements using outmoded factories and labour relations.

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Company in shambles, marriages ruined. My work here is done, says Ashley Madison CEO

John Brown (no body)
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Big Brother

Re: Oh dear

You mean like this guy?

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Wow, Barcelona really has a problem with tech disruptors. Watch out Airbnb

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Governments effectively seek to outlaw direct transactions between citizens

"without middlemen,"

What? AIrBnB is valued at $20b. If they aren't middlemen creaming off profit from "private" transactions, then what is your definition of a middleman?

A private transaction by two people is IMV normal and helps grease the wheels of the economy. When the likes of Uber, AirBnB et al formalise, commercialise and make stonking big profits from it, then it's a commercial operation that needs regulation not least to protect the customers from thieving gits out to take advantage of the system.

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Another chance to win a 6TB Western Digital Black hard drive

John Brown (no body)
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But...but...but...you're supposed to eat me afterwards!

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What time is it Oxford Dictionaries? How about almost ‘beer o’clock’

John Brown (no body)
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Re: English is rubbish...

wordtogetherfuckstorm

upvoterated

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Spaniard claims WWII WAR HERO pigeon code crack. Explain please

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Howt to heap shit on your own head

Guy has just admitted to breaching the official secrets act"

Does that apply to a Spaniard who never signed it?

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Legal eagles accuse Labour of data law breach over party purge

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Doesn't surprise me one bit

"One law for us, another for them"

If you were a member of their "club" then I don't think they have to stop unless you cancel your membership. If you weren't a member then I'd say they were probably in breach of something or other.

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Space paparazzo captures bipolar butterfly

John Brown (no body)
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"Minor pedantry, but surely if it's 4000 light years away, they were created 5200 years ago."

The pretty patterns, as we see them, are 1200 years old. But the light took 4000 years to get here. So they are both 1200 years old and 5200 years old. Until we looked at them, they could have been in either state. Blame Schroedinger!

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The Raspberry Pi is succeeding in ways its makers almost imagined

John Brown (no body)
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Re: the trick is ..

At uni? That's pretty damned good for a 6yo :-)

(I assume there was meant to be a "some years ago..." phrase in your post somewhere)

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Fiery old geysers FOUND ON MOON: Volcanic past explained

John Brown (no body)
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Facepalm

atomic oxygen?

OMG! That's like nooklear! Radioation and stuff. What's that you say? There's oxygen in the air? Ban it!! We're doomed, DOOMED I tells ya!

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NASA's Dawn gets intimate with Ceres

John Brown (no body)
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Yes, I was confused as to which brightly streaked slope he meant at first. I am so grateful for the clarificationism,

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'Hans free' mobe gag crowned Fringe's funniest

John Brown (no body)
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FAIL

Simon Munnery: "Clowns divorce. Custardy battle."

Oh FFS! I heard that in the school playground in the late 60's. Might have even been in The Beano or Dandy"! Kids today!!!

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Should all Europeans be able to watch Estonian football? Consultation launched

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Just buy a damn Freesat box and be done with it!

"Freesat does not have a licence to broadcast its material outside the UK."

Yes. The rights holders say they sell to broadcasters based on the potential audience size. If the potential audience for a Free To Air channel is the whole of Europe, the rights holders are going to want to charge far more and the EU is still a collection of sovereign nations with disparate national broadcasters. This could potentially kill the likes of FreeSat dead

On the other hand, encrypted subscription channels already know their precise potential audience wherever they happen to be located as they watch. More so if the box requires a constant or even regular 'net or phone connection to send viewing habits data back to the mothership. The only possible (weak IMV) argument against cross-borders subscription channels is artificial exclusivity in a territory.

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Manhattan-sized iceberg splits from glacier – and spotted FROM SPACE

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Just where do ...

"That's something that our radically surplus population are having an increasingly hard time with today; in our fully automated future there is even less room for them."

Don't worry, it's only about 35 years to WWIII then a few years later Cochran takes the first warp flight, the Vulcans arrive and we have cheap matter/anti-matter power.

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That thing we do in the UK? Should be ILLEGAL in the US, moans ex-State monopoly BT

John Brown (no body)
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Upvoted for the dripping sarcasm. I couldn't have put it better my self.

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Samsung smart fridge leaves Gmail logins open to attack

John Brown (no body)
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"and anything "smart" is by definition something that phones your private life to the mothership"

Yeah, my VM Tivo box does that but the phone app that lets me set, change or cancel a recording when I'm out and about with friends and someone tells me about a show I might want to watch, then it becomes an instantly useful IoT device for me. YMMV of course.

Having said that, my wife in particular is prone to switching off the TV and NOT the Tivo box so it's probably reporting back on all sorts or programmes that we never saw. Unless it's "smart" enough to not report back when the TV is off (HDMI should allow the Tivo to know if the TV is off or otherwise not displaying the Tivo output)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Not much 'ice' to crack there then.

"We're used to changing phones often because the technology improves rapidly, but do people really think they'll change their fridge every other year?"

The muttering has already started as early adopters of "smart" TVs now find that half of the apps no longer work. I'm even hearing this from non-IT people, ie average users, whinging about their "new" (ie 2 year old) smart TV gradually losing functionality. People expect a bare minimum of 5 years from big electrics, probably more like 10-15 years.

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John Brown (no body)
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Facepalm

Re: .a Remotely activate potential incendiary device.

Closely followed by EU legislation on maximum temperature setting both to protect us from ourselves and to minimise power consumption.

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Does Linux need a new file system? Ex-Google engineer thinks so

John Brown (no body)
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Re: @ Martijn Otto - You mean btrfs, surely

"the biggest stumbling block is ZFS' RAM requirements (it's a small file server, ~5TB disk, but "only" 8GB RAM)."

That's not a problem. Really. I've been running a 6TB home server with 1GB of RAM and RAIDz (4x2TB) for two years now. I *think* I may have set a tuneable to limit the RAM used by ZFS, not sure, it's pretty much fire and forget. The high RAM requirement comes into play when you have lots of files being accessed.

I have a backup process running as we speak rsyncing to another RAIDz pool copying ~4TB while watching video streamed to the TV and transcoding some video on a desktop from files on the server. The ARC is using 100MB and, unusually, there is 500MB of swap in use. Normally there's no swap in use but this is a "heavy load" in terms of my normal day to day use of the server.

On the other hand, I just order an 8GB ECC RAM stick for it. It'll be interesting to see if there are performance difference once tuned for the extra RAM.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: @ Martijn Otto - You mean btrfs, surely

"I just wish Oracle would change the licencing of ZFS out so it can be included with distros by default, instead of being cast out into a legal wilderness as it is now. "

You could switch to FreeBSD. ZFS is built in. The installer works for ZFS on boot device too.

The problem isn't the ZFS licensing. The problem is GPL requires that everything being integrated into a GPL system becomes GPL too and not all licenses will allow that change in status. Maybe if GPL was loosened a bit things would be a bit better.

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'Unexpected item in baggage area' assigned to rubbish area

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Never mind bag it, just bin it

"I pointed this out to the employee who turned up to help but she still treated me as if I was too thick to put my own socks on."

Try sandals.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: The latest stupid in these tills.

"With the arrival of Aldi in town, I'm not sure I like their strategy. You are ordered to just take your stuff straight from the checkout operator and dump it in the trolley. Shelves are provided for you to take all the fucking shopping out again and bag it up."

I find that strategy far more efficient. Their till operators scan it through so damned fast you rarely have time to bag the stuff up so taking the trolly to bagging shelf means you can take as long as you want to pack the bags properly so nothing gets crushed and the bags don't fall over in the car. This is helped with a little pre-planning by keeping your trolly tidy as you shop and placing stuff on the belt in the "right" order, ie heavy stuff first.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I must be to young

"Morrison's system has worked pretty well, but they have crammed in an extra till or two into the same area as Tesco's system and its a little cramped."

Same here. The only gripe I have is when paying by cash and I've just dropped a fistful of shrapnel in, it starts sorting and counting then shouts out "Please insert more cash" before it's finished counting and I've got that couple of seconds wondering if I really didn't put enough in or should I wait a little until it sorts itself out. On the upside, unlike another commenters report of getting many coins as change, Morrisons always gives change using the minimum number of coins except on those rare times when it's out of 50p coins or similar.

"Either way, you old folks keep complaining and don't use it, I like sailing right though with my shopping.

Maybe I've lead a sheltered 52 years of life but I also don't see innuendo in the robot voices and always check the queue lengths/quantities before deciding on a robot or manned till, although I never take a trolly load to a robot till. It's good mental exercise to estimate if four people queuing for the four robots will be quicker than the old dear with a trolly load at a manned till and has she got her purse out in advance or not!

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Enjoy vaping while you still can, warns Public Health England

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why should they ban them?

"I'd certainly not be happy if one was boiling beside me in a restaurant,"

The kitchen is a workplace and a "No Smoking" zone too so no steam allowed there by your definition. I assume you'll only ever be eating in restaurants that serve cold food and cold drinks from now on? We can't have the kitchen staff breathing in all that dangerous steam now, can we?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why should they ban them?

"wafting clouds of steam around me and my companions"

Why do you think it's "clouds of steam"? The only time I've ever seen "clouds of steam" is in dedicated vaping places used as the stock footage on news reports. It's almost as if there is an agenda and people like you seem to be falling for it,

"Have some good manners and indulge at home where you won't bother anyone else."

What makes you think I'm a smoker or vaper? Are you jumping to conclusions?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: nonsense..

"Let's not forget even if it's nothing but nicotine and water, it can still cause harm."

What harm can it cause? To whom?

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Spite

"Vaping unpicks all of the "progress" the anti-smokers have made in 30 years of campaigning. They restent that immensly. They'll gnash and wail and make excuses, but behind these new attacks on vaping, is nothing but spite."

Anti-smoking campaigners are also some of the most vociferous campaigners you are ever likely to meet. And like most campaigners of that type, it takes over their lives completely. Even those whose campaigns have come to an end with a win have to go out and find a new cause to "fight the good fight" because it's all they know. Their lives would be empty without a cause.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why should they ban them?

"I don't see any reason to ban them outright, but "No Smoking" zones should apply to fake cigarettes just as they do to real ones."

Why? There's no smoke. Should boiling kettles be banned too?

Most of the people I know use the cigarette-like ones, not the big bong pipe ones and the vapour which comes out is far less than the examples usually used on news broadcasts. The vapour is glycerin. Almost all of the nicotine is absorbed on inhaling. Any left in the exhale is negligible. There's no chance of "secondary" anything.

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John Brown (no body)
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Facepalm

Hypocracy?

"Vapping is almost certainly safer then breathing the air in London"

Not if you work for DEFRA! Their "smoking" policy bans the use of e-cigs and tells you to stand out in the "designated smoking area" to use them.

Yeah, great. I'm not sure how that jives with their smoking cessation policy. Send the people trying to give up out into the same place the real smokers are using and let them suck in all that passive cancer inducing smoke.

Actually, it's worse. IIRC the wording on the policy is something along the lines of "electronic cigarettes or other tobacco substitutes." I'm not sure of the exact wording but it's loose enough that anyone using a prescription substitute such as patches or gum is also caught by their rules. Law of unintended consequences strikes again. No doubt they'll say that patches and gum are allowed, but then that comes down to a subjective judgment and bending the rules from the strict letter.

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Brit hydro fuel cell maker: our tech charges iPhone 6 for a week

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Bah, humbug

You are not the target market. The target market is city hipsters who can't run a car because they have no where to park, would have to drive at a snails place to and from work every day and pay extortionate parking fees and/or congestion charges.. They have rationalised this problem away by saying they are proud not to have a car or even ever having learned to drive and so can't charge their phones on the go because buses/trains/underground don't have charging points. They are still waiting for every coffee shop to install inductive charging loops on every table.

A while back we got an email about company phones and data usage. "social media" was highlighted as being data hungry. I read it and was thinking WTF? Why are people using social media on company phones? Just ban that crap and watch the data usage drop! (and battery life go up)

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Ashley Madison hack – Tory MP Green denies registering account

John Brown (no body)
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Coat

Re: Excellent.

Brazilians? We shoot them here. Oh, you meant Bazillions?

Coat? Yeah, the one with the backpack. <ducks and walks, not runs, away>

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Win8 inventory glut? Yep, it's all Microsoft's fault, says HP

John Brown (no body)
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Happy

Re: Glutten Free?

Well, they are already FAT free

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Antiques in spaaaaace! Retired space shuttles cannibalised for parts

John Brown (no body)
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Mushroom

Re: Next time: the 8086

"you don't want you flight control computer making a computational glitch when calculating your orbit,"

Yeah, thankfully they didn't go bleeding edge with those new fangled Pentiums

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Could our fear of fracking be appeased with CO2 sequestration?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: It's not about AIR, it's about WATER

"almost daily occurrence of leaks in abandoned waste dumps "

Well, apart from the obvious, "abandoned", often many, many years ago when sealing and/or securing wasn't often considered, waste dumps are usually on or very near the surface, in or above the water table. Fracking is carried out well below the level of aquifers and the water table so only the drill site itself offers the possibility of a leak and as the article points out, the cement jacket stops that and can be tested and inspected. Once finished with, they simply fill the hole with more concrete, probably stronger then the surrounding rock.

This anti-fracking stuff seems to me to be about edge cases and fear of the unknown because "fossil fuel == bad", just as with nuclear or the current debate on e-cigs.

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Curiosity rolls over onto Martian WET PATCH, takes satisfied selfie

John Brown (no body)
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"...during its three years on Mars,"

Three years already? THREE YEARS! God, how time flies! It really doesn't feel that long since Curiosity was gently lowered to the surface from, of all things, a frikkin' rocket powered sky crane.

Excellent work by all involved, well done people!

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Why do driverless car makers have this insatiable need for speed?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: The end of any driving pleasure

"At least when I'm driving I can decide, on the spur of the moment, which route to take, when to stop, etc."

Maybe that only matters when you are actually driving and therefore looking out the window? If the car' is driving itself, the route might be less important to you if, for example, you are catching 40 winks, reading a book or watching TV. (or even doing some work!)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: The end of any driving pleasure

"After that people will continue making their own "

Only until you get caught driving an unauthorised ICE vehicle on manual. Them you're for the organ banks citizen!

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Colossus veteran flies a drone over Bletchley Park

John Brown (no body)
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Never having been there...

...yet(!!), it's almost sad to see the tacky signs of housing development so close to what should be a national monument. Almost as bad as an actual visit to the Great Pyramid in Egypt and finding it's down the bottom of some dirty street on the edge of a slum-like part of the city, hence the reason most photos look the same. It's the only way to get it all in and NOT see the filth of the city behind them,

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Rinky-dink musical accompaniment may grate on some

IIRC the term rinky-dink dates back to at least the 1940's USA and generally means small, cheap, cheesy with slight variations in meaning across it's lifetime. I'm sure I've seen Hollywood musicals refer to "that rinky-dink little tune" in the scripts.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Displays and flightradar24

"aero versions of hand-held receivers (think a Garmin/TomTom you'd have in your car) attached to the windscreen."

Yes, they do. I noticed the tell-tall rubber sucker stuck to the glass of a parked Hurricane on the news report :-)

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Pirate MEP: Microsoft's walled garden is no consumer pleasure park

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Dodgy legal ground..

"When you blindly clicked through to merrily install your 'free' gift from M$ you agreed to the T&Cs to allow them to spy on you and alter settings at their whim. All keystrokes on Windows 10 belong to M$."

Which may well be an "unfair contract" since they effectively pushed the upgrade on users and have made it almost impossible to say no by nagging you every 30 days to install Win10 even when you say no. Actually, you can't even say no. You can only defer saying yes.

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Raspberry Pi gains new FreeBSD distribution

John Brown (no body)
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Re: For those interested in servery type projects

My 6TB RAIDz (4x2TB) on an HP Microserver with 1GB of RAM runs ok. It's a personal server, three of us using it and it only serves music and video files on the whole and a backup destination for other devices in the house.

Considering that even a RasPi B2 still shares the USB and Ethernet over the same bus, I'd not expect it to work all that well in any sort of environment needing lots of data transfer or high availability although I'd love to be proved wrong!

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Snowball spud gun shows comets could have seeded Earth with life

John Brown (no body)
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Alien

"The problem I have with the Panspermia theory is that it violates Occam's razor."

My problem is that even if it turns out there is a simple and reliable mechanism for panspermia to work, where and how did the "first" life come into being? And THAT is what we are looking for whether panspermia is real or not.

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Captain, dark energy sensor readings show dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way

John Brown (no body)
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Re: DE not DM

"But no one really has any idea if it is some form of energy or something else completely. New physics: yay!"

:-) Thanks for the explanation.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: DE not DM

So, is "Dark Matter" or "Dark Energy" some form of matter or energy different to what we already know, or just "Normal" matter and energy we've not yet been able to see due to it being so faint or far away we've not noticed it yet?

I do note with interest that the percentage of "Dark Matter/Energy" we think makes up for the "missing" matter/energy to account for the universe expansion seems to have been downgraded in light of the discovery of more "normal" matter/energy, eg these new dwarf galaxies. Unless there is something special about our galaxy, I suppose we should assume that we are average and that the other 100 billion galaxies also have dwarf galaxies orbiting them. Should we expect the "missing" matter percentage to fall again and have even less "Dark Matter/Energy" to go looking for?

Maybe it's all just normal matter and we simply haven't identified it yet and need better detectors?

After all, the postulation of Dark Matter/Energy is, until some is found, just a "fudge" to account for the lack of observable matter and our idea of how much is needed to drive the observed apparent expansion of the universe.

PS IANAS[cientist] but listen to The Infinite Monkey Cage ;-)

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Conference Wi-Fi biz fined $750k for jamming personal hotspots

John Brown (no body)
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Facepalm

Re: We have always acted in good faith

Yes, that's what I came here to say too. After all, this is the USA where you buy a gun "out of the box" too, but it's up to the purchaser to know and understand where and when it's safe to use. Ignorance of the law is no excuse and use of signal jammers are very highly regulated in most countries since they are RF transmitters.

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