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* Posts by John Brown (no body)

1942 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Bryndzové halušky

John Brown (no body)
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gnocchi??

Sounds very similar to Italian gnocchi, although I usualy make that with cooked and mashed potato rather than raw, grated potato.

Aldi do it ready made in vacuum sealed packs (and probably full of chemicals/preservatives) if any less kitchen familier types want to try it. Just don't over boil it.

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UK's non-emergency police and NHS Vodafone systems go titsup NATIONWIDE

John Brown (no body)
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Happy

On a brighter note...

...all these reports from commentards about various phone services going tits up today might explain why we've not had a single spam phonecall today.

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Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!

John Brown (no body)
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Re: So...

"our country's main telecoms provider can't even host email"

Virginmedia outsource their email to Google. I wonder if it's a legal issue they are pre-empting by making email a clearly seperate and free offering so that they are not liable in any way for it's use, content, or reliablity.

IIRC there have been cases where a failed or broken "free" item or service have later been challenged in court such they were deemed to be an integral part of the primary goods or service and therefore included in any contractual agreement.

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'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT

John Brown (no body)
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“largest deployment of end-to-end decryption ever”.

“largest deployment of end-to-end decryption ever”.

Is it just me mis-reading or should that be "encryption", not "decryption"?

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Judge OKs $450m deal to end ebook price-hike row. But Apple just won't let it die

John Brown (no body)
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"It's not all smooth sailing to payday, however. Apple is still appealing the case and could reverse earlier rulings if its appeal comes through. That's unlikely, court watchers feel, but nothing is impossible in the wacky world of the American legal system."

Is the implication of the above that Apple may not actually pay out if they win their appeal against earlier rulings?

That would be a bit odd since by its very nature, an out-of-court settlement is effectively an agreement to make an ex gratia or "good will" payment to aggrieved partys without admitting to any guilt or wrongdoing. Since they don't admit to any wrongdoing, then the outcome of appeals relating to earlier cases ought to have no bearing on this settlement.

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Mozilla remembers 2013. Y'know, back when it still gobbled at the Google money-trough

John Brown (no body)
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WTF?

"the unenviable position of reporting a mere 1 per cent year-on-year growth"

So? It's a non-profit foundation. Revenue groweth is irrelevant so long as income matches or exeeds expenditure. It's not as if there are share holders expecting dividends or VCs to keep happy.

If Mozilla discovered a way to halve costs while still meeting all their objectives, who would be up in arms if revenue went into "negative groweth" of 50%?

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Google Contributor: Ad-block killer – or proof NO ONE will pay for news?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: huh?

"What's an ad?"

These days, it appears they are full sound and video auto-running presentations that completely obscure the article you want to read and are unstoppable. At least that was my experience on El Reg the other day using a fresh install of firefox for which I'd forgotton to add the "sanity" plugins.

For sites like El Reg where ad revenue is important I'd happily not block the ads if they were not so intrusive as to either obscure the article or distract my attention with flashing animations. I found this site unusable wthiout ad/flash blocking. God only knows what it must do to screen readers for blind users.

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All aboard the Poo Bus! Ding ding, route Number Two departing

John Brown (no body)
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Mushroom

Poo pooing can be fatal to moral

General Melchett: Well, I hope so, Blackadder. You know, if there's one thing I've learnt from being in the Army, it's never ignore a pooh-pooh. I knew a Major, who got pooh-poohed, made the mistake of ignoring the pooh-pooh. He pooh-poohed it! Fatal error! 'Cos it turned out all along that the soldier who pooh-poohed him had been pooh-poohing a lot of other officers who pooh-poohed their pooh-poohs. In the end, we had to disband the regiment. Morale totally destroyed... by pooh-pooh!

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Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU

John Brown (no body)
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Re: It should of course be:

"Ahem."

(Note to self: Alway, always, ALWAYS use the joke icon when making a sarky joke)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: It should of course be:

"Of course all of this pales compared against the recent decimation of the word "again", to be replaced by the hateful "re-" at every opportunity!"

Are you saying "re-" is used in the place of "again" every tenth time? Or is it re-decimated multiple times to increase the affect? You could of fooled me.

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Privacy bods offer GOV SPY VICTIMS a FREE SPYWARE SNIFFER

John Brown (no body)
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Joke

Re: Just use a Live CD

"For heaven's sakes, the CD can't be altered, so there's a guarantee of no spyware between boots."

Ah, but the latest bootable CD needs to be kept up to date with the latest version and all the latest anonymising and stealth techniques so we have to keep burning a new version each time. I know, lets use a CD-RW or better, DVD-RAM.

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Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Why remove it ?

"Was on BBC breakfast,"

Just saw it on the local BBC news too. Hackers did it. The Police are looking into to the matter. LOL

At least the reporter did eventually get to the point that it's the fault of ignorant users retaining the default password rather than the l33t skills of h4Xors.

(Please note, I said ignorant, not stupid. Ignorence can be cured with education, while stupid is, well, stupid. It's a shame the BBC didn't take the opportunity to educate properly by emphasising the default password thing more. It is part of the BBC Charter after all, let alone their plans to educate the masses in "coding", comming soon(tm)

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All ABOARD! Furious Facebook bus drivers join Teamsters union

John Brown (no body)
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Re: inequality and entitlement...

"Seems to me the best solution is to knock them down to part time.

...or FB and other local companies take advantage of all these people sitting around unpaid for six hours and employ then on a part time basis. I'm sure that at the very least there's a number of possiblities even for unskilled work sich as grasscutters, janitors, litter pickers, canteen staff over busy lunch periods, not to mention other jobs which could be done by those drivers with more skills which could be job shares or part-tme. Just because they're currently bus drivers doesn't mean they are not qualified for other jobs but it's just not econmical to travel so far to work in the FB part of town and there's nothing local.

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John Brown (no body)
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Joke

Re: Teamsters

"I'm sure Facebook employees can work remotely easier than most."

Maybe FB should be investing in drone technolgy so the bus drivers can work remotely too.

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Giant bank IT cockup of 2012 'could have brought down ENTIRE financial system'

John Brown (no body)
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Gimp

Re: The cause of the IT incident...

"an almost unilateral decision I made"

No wonder you posted AC!!

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John Brown (no body)
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Upvoted because that struck me as odd too, likewise not defending the bankers, but curious why 4 downvotes with no explanation from any of them as to what's wrong with your post or sentiment.

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London police chief: City bankers, prepare for a terrorist cyber attack. Again

John Brown (no body)
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Quaking in my boots...

...because something might happen, sometime in the future.

As others have said, the terrorists have won when our own governnmets and officials are creating the terror for them.

It reminds me a bit of the USA "winning" the cold war by outspending the USSR, sometimes with judicious "leaks" of very expensive research and tech claimed to be being worked on so as to divert funds.

Terrorist are now at the point where they only have to "leak" plans, possibly with a patsy or two being implicated, and "we" spend millions investigating and increasing our securuity theatre.

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Hello, Mr Chips(et): Capita grabs bigger slice of UK IT education market

John Brown (no body)
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"Or why the government doesn't just bulk purchase the kit at a volume discount price."

That's what the framework things are all about. Multi-million pound purchase deals at bulk rates which suppliers bid for. The idea being that successful and vetted bidders will still be around to deliver, will have the ability to supply and support as per contract and will bid at bulk rate discount prices. On the downside, there is no obligation on the purchasers side of the contract to actually buy anything at all and as well know from many stories on El Reg, some of the "usual suspects" bid for then fail to deliver anyway.

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HORROR! Imagine if anyone could find out EVERYTHING you EVER tweeted

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Sinister

I see the GCHQ/NSA downvoter is on the ball today. Must be performance review time.

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John Brown (no body)
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Sinister

Imagine if it turned out that the phone company recorded every phone call and decided to put them online and searchable.

Ditto the post office doing the same for every letter ever sent.

Yes, technology has changed and yes, these are different companies with differnt obligations and rules and the data is "public" to a greater extent, but I think most users have a slighty greater expectation of privacy than is being afforded them. Morals, ethics and laws are a long way behind the abilities of the tech and the expectations of the users.

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Boffins train robots to pull apart LCD screens – without breaking them

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Eh?

"Show it cutting once and move on"

The point was to show the robot making shallow cuts so as to remove just the relevant parts without cutting right through whatever is below it. ie, demonstrating that it is "learning" by making a cut then checking to see if the cut was deep enough.

The disappointing part was not seeing it demonstrating the learned behaviour by showing that it can recognise another identical model and then chopping it up fast without error.

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Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins

John Brown (no body)
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On a positive note....

...the number of recently discovered vulns dating back in some case many, many years, does show that people are now actively checking old code where previously they have been assuming it was all "good" because "surely it's already been checked, we've used it for years". This is a good thing for everyone.

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NOKIA - Not FINNished yet! BEHOLD the somewhat DULL MYSTERY DEVICE!

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "Nokia said China would receive it first" @disembodied John Brown

"brown ale. lovely, lovely brown ale."

Brewing moved to Gateshead quite some years ago and has since moved to, IIRC, Tadcaster in Yorkshire. They dropped the claim for regional protected status on the name on moving brewing out of Newcastle.

That's almost like the Nokia --> MS Lumia, to get back on topic

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "Nokia said China would receive it first" @disembodied John Brown

"The North East used to have many coal mines,"

Having been born, bred, raised and still live in the NE a few miles from what is now only "the site of" Westoe Pit, what was one of the UKs "superpits", I can only say "whoooosh!"

(For clarification, after most of the pits shut down, coal, mainly from Australia (Newcastle, I think), was shipped into the Tyne, hence the reversal of the "joke".

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "Nokia said China would receive it first"

"first shipments of coal to Newcastle expected in new year"

That's not funny anymore. Coal is no longer shipped to Newcastle as there are no nearby powerstations that use it so there's no point. Oh! Now I see where you're coming from!

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ATTACK OF THE DRONES: ‘Nefarious’ private use rising, says top Blighty copper

John Brown (no body)
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Re: FFS...

Ta.

Looks like ballons are not covered though, that's good. Tethered would be best for aerial photography :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: FFS...

"Well, despite your best efforts to lock people up BEFORE they have committed an offence, that tends to be what happens."

Maybe it's just badly worded, but I think he was referring to how difficult it is to catch them in the act or even to catch them when Police are called to an "incident" as referenced in the article. There's certainly been stories of speeders and dangerous drivers being caught after posting videos of their exploits on YouTube.

More importantly, when does a remote controlled flying object become liable to the current regulations? What about those tiny cheap helicopters you can buy in gadget shops? Some even stream video back to your phone.

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Ofcom tackles complaint over Premier League footie TV rights

John Brown (no body)
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Facepalm

Re: Really?

"Presumably the next revelation will be that the rights to Serie A sell for more in Italy than they do here."

RTFM!

That's the point. Serie A in Italy is cheaper than Premier is in the UK. The comparison is what domestic consumers pay for their domestic footy.

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Vulture 2 spaceplane tumbles onto BBC World Service

John Brown (no body)
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Avionics pod?????

Shirly that's an Avionics Podule?

Admittadly Lester did pause (enough to be called out on it in Just A Minute, the game we love to play), possibly as the brain churned over rapidly to make a snap decision on whether the listeners would understand what a podule is. Sadly he went with pod instead of podule.

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Sealed with a kiss: Er, 80 MILLION BACTERIA

John Brown (no body)
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many of our faces chase off potential snog partners

Was it just me that read that as feaces?

Monkey see, monkey do.

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You know those WEIRD glass sheds in New York? They'll be replaced with Gbps WiFi

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Riiiight...

"And if you connect and hack the State Dept, how do they track that?"

Even the "free" calls will require your ID card. And hidden, always on webcams like cash machines (NSA sponsored T&Cs).

Papers please citizen!

(About time we brought that meme back - or maybe not)

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John Brown (no body)
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New jobs?

I wonde what the net total of new jobs will be after the phone company makes all those guys redundsant who maintain/fix/empty cashboxes for the current phones?

Great idea on the whole, but I do wish these sorts of announcements would stop trumpeting big numbers of new jobs and "forgetting" all those poor buggy whip makers who will starve if they can't get on the re-training scheme..

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The Nokia ENIGMA THING and its SECRET, TERRIBLE purpose

John Brown (no body)
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"I was actually thinking "femtocell".

Me too. And a home router all-in-one. You plug it into your "up to" broadband.

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It's space WAR: Comet launches fireballs at space-invading EARTH

John Brown (no body)
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Boffin

Re: Meh..

"Decide, requires? I think you'll find there wasn't much choice in the matter."

All the first self-replicating "life" got together and held a referendum on whether the planet should rotate or not. The rotaters won by a narrow margin againsts the statics although every now and then the statics flip the magnetic poles to try and stop the rotation. They lost out in the short term but are slowly gaining ground hence the need to adjust our clocks every few years and/or add leap seconds.

The debate continues.

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THERE it is! Philae comet lander FOUND in EXISTING Rosetta PICS

John Brown (no body)
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Thumb Up

"we could estimate the top speed of a Clanger in an emergency, good science"

...and an excellent addition to the Reg units system.

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BAD SANTA: Don't get ripped off this Christmas

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Further shopping tips

"stopping a cheque before it's been cashed."

IIRC correctly, a cheque can be "stopped" or cancelled for at least a year after it's date, whether it's been cashed or not. The issuing bank will claim the cash back from the depositing bank and eventually out of the account it was paid into. Something the bare in mind if/when you accept payment by cheque.

I'm pretty sure this action will cost you a fee of some sort from your bank too.

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Sky: We're no longer calling ourselves British. Yep. And Broadcasting can do one, too

John Brown (no body)
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Re: So does this mean

"Just think about all of the ...er.. homegrown quality drama they make."

Was it not Sky who paid to make the Terry Pratchett Discworld stuff?

Ah,yes, here it is.

I'm not really defending Sky, and certainly not Murdoch, but bare in mind roses grow in shit ;-)

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John Brown (no body)
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I believe the term for those who stump up the money are "consumers"

I think the word you are looking for is "product". The only industry where the product pays its own money to be sold to customers (advertisers)

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Stop coding and clean up your UI, devs, it's World Usability Day

John Brown (no body)
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Yes, that always reminds me of the days when I used to buy paper maps. A road atlas sold as "Voted Britains Clearest Mapping". It was great. Lovely clear maps. Easy to use. Excellent UI. Except when you needed to find small out of the way places. You make a map "clear" by leaving stuff out. Suddenly it's no longer useful.

Computer UIs are being dumbed down in the the same way and that's unforgivable because it's piss easy to make all those other functions available to those who want them while keeping them hidden from those who don't. But so often the advanced function are missing altogether or hidden so well as to be almost unusable.

Personally, I think a lot of the problem is caused by designers who have no idea what users actually do. As with many self-selected groups of people, they have little concept of how other people outside the group think and that what they think is obvious is not so for other people not in the group.

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'Yes, yes... YES!' Philae lands on COMET 67P

John Brown (no body)
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Excellent.

...although landing doesn't seem terribly accurate. It seems more like a docking manoeuvre.

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My HOUSE used to be a PUB: How to save the UK high street

John Brown (no body)
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Re: @Captan Boing Evolution

"force of habit and the big marketing budgets of the supermarkets"

Gawd yes. Tescos is losing market share, Sainburys is in the red and Morrisons latest gimmick is saying they "price match" with Aldi and Lidl. I thought the "big boys" were supposed to be using economies of scale and so able to offer the best prices and therefore are the cause of other, smaller shops, going out of business. And yet they can't seem to compete on price or quality with those same smaller shops and, as you say, it's habit and marketing budget keeping so many shoppers from looking elsewhere. Things have been changing slowly, as the above mentioned problems the big boys are having demonstrates, but so many of the smaller, local shops are already gone. Maybe we'll just end up with a bit of a re-shuffle and some new boys (Aldi, Lidl) added into the big boys club.

Now, if only Morrisons could learn that we are not all stupid and we can check that the bag of "8 bananas" is twice the price by weight of the loose bananas.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Pubs already being converted

"old-man's boozers have been shut and converted into either flats, Co-Ops or Spars."

I noticed a few years ago in Middlesbrorough that a church was now MoneyShop/cheque cashing/loan operation. A little ironic I thought at the time.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: A few minor changes in law are in order here

What does making parking restrictions "revenue neutral" actually mean?"

Parking fees + parking fines = parking costs/maintenance + cost of enforcement is the theory.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: A missed opportunity

"Amazon use them for both deliveries and pickup."

I was in Argos yesterday for the first time in a long time and one of the collection points is liveried with a big Ebay logo. The Ebay collection point also has a till, scanner and card reader so I assume you can send stuff back there too, or maybe that was just their own "returns" facility. I didn't ask :)

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SUPER-JAMMY Philae comet probe got down WITHOUT harpoons

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Bloomin typical !

According to a report by the Sun, Comet was sailing too close to the [solar] wind, was shedding capital like there's no tomorrow and eventually faded away.

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Euro space boffins ready, mere HOURS from flinging Rosetta lander at Comet 67P

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "into a speeding comet"?????

"The lander is harpooning the rock and then, once on the surface, drilling into it."

Yes. That's ruined some good SciFi. Everyone knows that comets are just big dustballs or collections of rock and ice boulders that a spaceship can carefully manoeuvre into to collect samples, mine or "hitch" a ride. They are NOT supposed to look this solid. We need more missions like this to find the "proper" comets. See, for example, Into The Comet, Arthur C. Clarke

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We don't NEED NO STEENKIN' DRONE RULES, peers told

John Brown (no body)
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"In case you missed a meeting, people are already filming up women's skirts in public and putting the videos up on the internet."

...and that's already illegal in many if not most jurisdictions under either or both of privacy laws or decency laws. There is no need for a new law forbidding that activity. I'm not sure if that was just a crap analogy or if you are in favour of no new anti-flying camera laws.

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John Brown (no body)
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"To say privacy laws are suitable today just as much as they were yesterday, is similar to saying driving laws don't need to change to account for mobiles texting."

You mean driving recklessly, driving without due care and attention, dangerous driving, not being in full control of the vehicle? There was never a need for a new law banning the use of mobile phones in the same way there is no special law saying you can't eat an apple while driving. Just as the use of camera drones is already covered by existing privacy laws.

Apologies for the Daily Mail link. I feel dirty.

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ESA sends back PRE-LANDING COMET CLOSE-UPS

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Barreling along

Although maintaining the pedantry, a better example considering the context, might be to compare with landing on the Moon and Mars in terms of "attempted to land on a huge rock as it speeds through space".

I don't see the point in mentioning the speed of said rock since the speed means nothing without a reference point and the only valid reference in space is the relative speed difference between the two objects concerned.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Cool

I was thinking of the mesa from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It must be a fake!!!!

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Opinion

Love

Chris Mellor

Tandberg and Sphere3D deals offer hope after 18 bad ones
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Openstack log

Features

No, silly... he was the fall guy for years of Finnish folly
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Frodo and the Ring
Microsoft's strategy is to make Store apps popular. Good luck with that